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Over the next month the Sedona Fire District Governing Board will be pouring over a binder-full of documents as it decides whether or not to pursue an $18 million bond.

During its meeting Wednesday, May 17, the board received a presentation from the citizen committee that was formed to look into funding sources for the district. Committee Co-chairman David Watters said he and the others met 10 times over two months weighing options of how to cover the cost of major capital improvement projects. In the end, they chose to recommend a bond.

After months of discussion and expert input, a citizen committee formed to look at the current and future needs of the Sedona Fire District has made its recommendation.

During its final meeting on Thursday, May 11, the committee recommended the district move forward with a bond in an amount not to exceed $18 million. The amount is based on the committee’s determination that proposed capital projects are necessary and are considered to be high priorities.

Don’t let the name fool you.

A bike rodeo does not feature horses, bulls or roping of any kind. What it does offer is a way for children to learn proper bike maintenance and safety.

One man is arrested while transporting drugs and cash in his car, acting as a “mule” for a drug cartel. Another is a young man who made one illicit errand while using his mother’s car to go to the bank.

Both could be subject to having their cars and cash seized.

According to Sarah Porter, Director of the Kyl Center for Water Policy, the future of the Verde Valley’s communities is inextricably tied to the Verde River, as well as tributaries like Oak Creek.

Porter delivered her keynote address, “The Price of Uncertainty,” to nearly 200 participants in the Verde River: State of the Watershed Conference, Thursday, May 11, at Clarkdale’s Clark Memorial Clubhouse.

Sedona City Attorney Robert Pickels said he can’t find any instance in which a Sedona-initiated bill has made its way through the state legislature and onto the governor’s desk for signing.

That is until now. Earlier this week, House Bill 2116 had its final reading and passed in the House by a vote of 59-0. The bill was introduced by Rep. Bob Thorpe [RDistrict 6] and co-sponsored by Rep. Brenda Barton [R-District 6].

It came at the request of the city of Sedona to clarify the zoning area within which property owners adjacent to an area subject to a rezoning application may protest. An amendment will be offered in the Senate which will include the subject property in the definition of a zoning area. Gov. Doug Ducey signed the bill into law on Wednesday, May 10.

After having narrowed down the field to four finalists and interviewing each, the Sedona City Council chose its newest magistrate judge.

On Wednesday, May 17, council chose former Sedona City Attorney Michael Goimarac, who retired from that position two years ago. Since then he has been serving as a Yavapai County Superior Court judge protem, Flagstaff magistrate judge and a Verde Valley Justice Court judge pro-tem.

The Sedona City Council’s tentative budget hearing was scheduled to take about 30 minutes to complete on Tuesday, May 16. More than two and a half hours later it was unanimously approved.

The total budget, after changes made throughout the budget workshops last month, is $47,752,118. This represents a $9.4 million — or 24 percent — increase from fiscal year 2016-17.

The Sedona City Council has spent numerous hours reviewing potential options to mitigate traffic in and around Sedona.

But during its Tuesday, May 9, meeting, discussions went in a slightly different direction.

Seniors know it’s almost time to graduate once their exhibitions are done.

Each year, members of the senior class at Sedona Red Rock High School present their senior exhibitions, a project of their choosing that is planned throughout the year.

One senior got an early start, however, beginning plans at the end of her junior year. Skyler Plouffe impressed exhibition judges with her yet-to-be-titled mixed media work.

Two teenagers are killed just as they are ready to embark on the next chapter of their lives, while a third will have to live with the guilt of their deaths the rest of his life.

That was the scenario during the second phase of the Every 15 Minutes program on Friday, April 21, at Sedona Red Rock High School. The previous day was the mock accident in which senior Chas Rescigno was arrested for driving under the influence.

The crash claimed the lives of two of his classmates, Walker Cox and Xan Hawes.

Dina Aita is only 16 years old, but has probably seen more than any of her peers. She lives in Gaza, but has spent the past school year on exchange at Sedona Red Rock High School. In an interview with the Sedona Red Rock News, she discussed her time in the United States and her life back home.

Q: Why did you want to go on exchange and how did you end up in the United States?

A: The basic two reasons for me to go on exchange .... the first one is to get out of Gaza. It’s hard to travel, so I wanted to see the outside world and this was the first opportunity for me to travel out of Gaza.

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